NEWLY DEDICATED STATUE OF ST. BERNADETTE DAMAGED OUTSIDE QUEENS CATHOLIC CHURCH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 17, 2021

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NEWLY DEDICATED STATUE OF ST. BERNADETTE DAMAGED OUTSIDE QUEENS CATHOLIC CHURCH

            The Diocese of Brooklyn this afternoon is reporting an act of vandalism that has caused destruction to a newly installed statue of St. Bernadette, located outside St. Michael’s Roman Catholic Church in the Flushing section of Queens.

The incident occurred at approximately 3:30 a.m. this morning when a man jumped over the church fence and knocked the statue over. The damage to the statue is in the area of the left forearm and wrist.

The statue of St. Bernadette and a statue of Our Lady of Lourdes were dedicated earlier this summer, in remembrance of all parishioners who lost their lives to the Coronavirus.  Father Vincentius Do, Pastor of St. Michael’s Catholic Church, is already planning to have the statue repaired.

            “St. Michael’s plays a central role in the faith and care of our neighbors through our masses and faith-based services and that feed the hungry.  For sure this act of vandalism is upsetting, but the faithful of St. Michael’s and I are praying for the person who committed this act against our church. It is important to find the good in all things, and so I wish to take this opportunity to encourage the public to respect our church and our property, as well as that of all houses of worship,” said Father Vincentius Do, Pastor.

The 109th Precinct of the New York City Police Department is investigating. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477).

St. Michael’s Roman Catholic Church, the first parish founded in Queens County in 1833, is located at 136-76 41st Avenue in Flushing. St. Bernadette is the patron saint of the poor, those ridiculed for their faith, and the sick.

Photos of the damaged statue are attached.

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Discussing Latino Catholicisim

St. Joseph’s Seminary and America Magazine have created a partnership in presenting topics of interest to Catholics in and around New York. Last year, we had three lectures, Flannery O’Connor and her writing of Prayer Journal, Catholic Media, and Pope Francis and the Internet.

To kick off the 2015-2016 academic year, we are hosting a lecture on “Discussing Latino Catholicism” with Professor Timothy Matovina, Ph.D. Professor Valerie Torres, Ph.D, will respond, and the lecture will be moderated by Fr. Matt Malone, S.J. The event will take place at the Sheen Center for Thought and Culture on October 15, from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM. The Sheen Center is located in Manhattan, 18 Bleecker St.  I am including the flyer which is more detailed on the evening’s event.

For further information, see the flyer below.

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

 

Congratulations Principal Rogone!

Congratulations to Maureen Rogone, principal at Most Holy Redeemer Catholic Academy, for receiving The University Partnership Award for 2015 from the St. John’s University School of Education, Department of Education Specialties and Counseling. This award is in recognition of our outstanding school partnership with Most Holy Redeemer Catholic Academy through Project TIE (Training Innovative Educators). This award acknowledges outstanding principals who have successfully implemented the K-8, School-Wide ELA and Math Professional Development for initiatives in their Catholic Elementary School, working directly with St. John’s University faculty over a period of three years.

Left to Right: Maureen Rogone, Principal of Most Holy Redeemer Catholic Academy; Francine Guastello, Ed.D., Associate Professor & Chair of Department of Education Specialties and Counseling for St. John’s University; Michael Sampson, Ph.D., Dean of The School of Education for St. John’s University.

Read more »

Aquinas Expo 2015

 

Students from the Aquinas Honors Society gathered to present their work in Brooklyn and Queens at the Diocesan Aquinas Expos. Students use their “passports to learning” during the expo to visit and learn from other student expositions, in addition to presenting their own work. They sign each others passports as they go and the event concludes with Mass.

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Supporting Our Schools, Supporting Our Students

For the past few years, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn has been working with the other Catholic dioceses in New York State, as well as Jewish and Protestant leaders, to build support for the Education Investment Tax Credit (A2551), the proposed bill that would raise funds for public schools and strengthen organizations that provide scholarships to children attending private and parochial schools. Enacting this legislation would empower parents to choose to send their children to private and parochial schools.

What follows are some of the Diocese’s efforts thus far in 2015: Read more »

‘The Potential of a Good Education’ by Bishop DiMarzio

May 13, 2015 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

Mid-May begins the graduation season, first for colleges and universities, and then high schools and eventually for elementary schools. It is always heartwarming to see proud graduates be recognized for the hard work which they put in for being good students. And justly proud they should be for the commitment they have had to using all God’s talents given to them and improve them through the educational process.

It is truly a loss to our society and Church if our young people do not pursue an education to the highest level available to them. The problems today that impede young people from seeking a college education, or even higher education, usually comes in the form of daunting tuitions and interminable loans that need to be taken in order to continue the education process.

Some have even questioned if a college education or professional education is truly worthwhile. From the monetary point of view, research shows that college graduates earn more through a lifetime than those who have not graduated college. It is so much more difficult to calculate, however, the contribution that those educated make to our society.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.