Declaración sobre la jubilación del obispo auxiliar Octavio Cisneros

PARA PUBLICACIÓN INMEDIATA: 30 de octubre de 2020

CONTACTOS DE PRENSA:


Adriana Rodríguez
646-241-9805
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

 

Declaración sobre la jubilación del obispo auxiliar Octavio Cisneros

 

La Diócesis de Brooklyn anuncia que hoy nuestro Santo Padre, el papa Francisco, ha aceptado la renuncia de Mons. Octavio Cisneros, a su cargo de obispo auxiliar de la Diócesis de Brooklyn.

“Agradezco al obispo Cisneros por su voluntad de servicio; tuve el honor de ordenarlo y consagrarlo como Obispo Auxiliar el 6 de junio de 2006. Permanecerá como párroco en la Iglesia Holy Child Jesus y St. Benedict Joseph Labre en Richmond Hill, Queens, y continuará en sus funciones como vicario de Asuntos Hispanos. Le damos las gracias al obispo Cisneros por sus años de liderazgo diocesano y estamos agradecidos de que siga sirviendo a la Diócesis en Brooklyn y Queens”, declaró Mons. Nicholas DiMarzio, obispo de Brooklyn.

Tal como lo estipula la ley canónica de la Iglesia (Código de Derecho Canónico), al cumplir 75 años, todos los obispos deben presentar una carta de renuncia al cargo eclesiástico que ocupan. Depende de la Santa Sede determinar cuándo aceptar esa renuncia. En el caso de los obispos auxiliares, la aceptación de una renuncia suele ocurrir poco después de cumplir 75 años.

“Les agradezco enormemente al papa Benedicto y al obispo DiMarzio por darme la plenitud del sacerdocio en 2006 para poder ayudar a ministrar como Obispo Auxiliar, lo que ha sido gratificante y satisfactorio para mí. Le agradezco también al papa Francisco por su constante apoyo a nuestros obispos. Es una inspiración para todos nosotros. Durante 49 años, he vivido un sacerdocio muy feliz en la Diócesis de Brooklyn y espero continuar mi ministerio sacerdotal”, expresó Octavio Cisneros, obispo auxiliar emérito de Brooklyn.

Mons. Cisneros nació en Las Villas, provincia de Cuba, el 19 de julio de 1945. En octubre de 1961, cuando era estudiante de secundaria, llegó a los Estados Unidos como refugiado político, como parte de la Operación Peter Pan, una maniobra humanitaria en la que estuvo involucrada la Iglesia Católica y que voló a más de 14.000 menores de Cuba a Estados Unidos.

Fue ordenado sacerdote de la Diócesis de Brooklyn el 29 de mayo de 1971, y desde el año 2007 ha sido párroco de la Iglesia Holy Child Jesus y St. Benedict Joseph Labre. También ha servido en la Iglesia de St. Michael y como párroco de Our Lady of Sorrows, en Corona.

Durante su sacerdocio, ha sido nombrado Vicario episcopal o territorial en el Vicariato Este de Brooklyn, y rector de la Residencia del Seminario Catedral en Douglaston. En el año 1988 el papa san Juan Pablo II lo distinguió con el título pontificio de Prelado de Honor de Su Santidad.

El obispo Cisneros también ha participado en el Centro católico del noreste para hispanos, el Instituto Nacional Hispano de Liturgia, el Comité de Liturgia de los obispos y el Comité Asesor de sacerdotes. También ha servido en el Consejo Superior del Seminario de la Inmaculada Concepción y fue presidente de la Conferencia de Directores Diocesanos para el apostolado hispano.

Se adjunta una foto de Mons. Cisneros.

Comunicado de prensa emitido por la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los Estados Unidos:

https://www.usccb.org/news/2020/pope-francis-accepts-resignation-auxiliary-bishop-octavio-cisneros-brooklyn

 

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Statement on the Retirement of Auxiliary Bishop Octavio Cisneros

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 30, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
646-241-9805
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

Statement on the Retirement of Auxiliary Bishop Octavio Cisneros

 

The Diocese of Brooklyn announces that today, our Holy Father, Pope Francis, has accepted the resignation of Octavio Cisneros from the office of auxiliary bishop for the Diocese of Brooklyn.

“I am grateful to Bishop Cisneros for his willingness to serve and was honored to ordain him and consecrate him as an auxiliary Bishop on June 6, 2006.  He will remain as pastor at the Church of the Holy Child Jesus & St. Benedict Joseph Labre in Richmond Hill, Queens, and will continue to serve as Vicar for Hispanic Concerns. We thank Bishop Cisneros for his years of Diocesan leadership and are grateful he will continue to serve the Diocese in Brooklyn and Queens,” said the Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn.

As required by Canon (Church) law, upon turning 75, all bishops must submit a letter of resignation from the ecclesiastical office that they hold. It is up to the Holy See to determine when to accept that resignation. In the case of auxiliary bishops, the acceptance of a resignation typically occurs shortly after turning 75.

“I am most grateful to Pope Benedict and Bishop DiMarzio for giving me the fullness of the priesthood in 2006 so that I can help minister as auxiliary bishop, which has been rewarding and fulfilling for me. I am thankful to Pope Francis for his continued support of our bishops. He is an inspiration for all of us. I have lived a very happy priesthood in the Diocese of Brooklyn for 49 years and look forward to continuing my priestly ministry,” said Octavio Cisneros, Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus of Brooklyn.

Bishop Cisneros was born in Las Villas, a province of Cuba, on July 19, 1945. In October 1961, while a high school student, he came to the United States as a political refugee as part of Operation Peter Pan, a Catholic humanitarian effort that brought 14,000 unaccompanied minors to the U.S. from Cuba.

He was ordained a priest of the Brooklyn Diocese on May 29, 1971, and has been pastor at the Church of the Holy Child Jesus & St. Benedict Joseph Labre since 2007. He has also served at St. Michael’s Church and as pastor of Our Lady of Sorrows Church in Corona.

Throughout his priesthood, he has been appointed as an Episcopal, or Territorial, Vicar in the Brooklyn East Vicariate, and as rector of Cathedral Seminary Residence in Douglaston. He was named a Prelate of Honor by Pope John Paul II in 1988.

Bishop Cisneros has also been involved with the Northeast Catholic Center for Hispanics, the “Instituto Nacional Hispano de Liturgia,” the Bishop’s Committee on the Liturgy and the Pastors’ Advisory Committee. He has served on the Board of Governors of Immaculate Conception Seminary and as past President of the Conference of Diocesan Directors for the Spanish Apostolate.

Attached is a photo of Bishop Cisneros.

Press release issued by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops:

https://www.usccb.org/news/2020/pope-francis-accepts-resignation-auxiliary-bishop-octavio-cisneros-brooklyn

 

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All Youth and Families are welcomed to the BCYD 2020

The Youth Ministry Committee of the Secretariat of Evangelization and Catechesis would like to encourage all students to make a short video that will be transmitted on the upcoming Brooklyn & Queens Catholic Youth Day on November 21, 2020.

There are 2 theme options, (you are encouraged to do both if preferred):

  1. A 30 to 60-second video max where they say the phrase “I am a child of God” and “I am a daughter/son of God”. There needs to be a 3-5 second gap in between each phrase.
  2. A video where you show your talent/gifts such as reciting poetry, dance, playing an instrument, etc.

To send the videos or form more questions please email Lucia Morales at lmorales@diobrook.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the image to download the flyer of the event.

My Daddy Is Going To Change The World

On March 15th, 2020, my world changed when the pastor of our parish announced that it was our last Mass, and that all church programs and activities were suspended indefinitely.  One could see the concern on his face. It felt like a tsunami wave had just rolled over us. Did Father just say that the church would be closing? Not the church! This is God’s House; this is where we come when bad things are happening so we can be assured that everything is going to be all right. This is our port in a storm. “September 11” immediately came to mind.  The church is where everyone ran to, but this was different. The church was shutting us out. Then, an overwhelming feeling of fear, emptiness, and sadness came over me. The pandemic (COVID-19) had come to our doors and shut us down. It seems like I was in a time warp something out of the movie “Star Trek.”  What followed was one nightmare after another.

There was a quietness in this City that was haunting. Then came a wave of haunting sounds, screaming ambulance sirens, one after another; nonstop; all day, and all night. There were so many it was heartbreaking. This got to me; I could feel death. At one point, I began to count them, but I lost track; and instead, I would whisper a prayer; “Dear God let that one makes it”.

Our lives changed forever. All the things we took for granted were taken away in one day. New York came to a stop. We were told to shelter in place-stay indoors.  The images coming from our television sets were mind-boggling. Death had surrounded us and taken over our City. The numbers each day were unbelievable.  This was a war zone. The fight the first responders put up was incredible. There was so much anxiety in the voices of our Governor and our Mayor as they tried to reassure and guide the residents of New York through this unmatchable monster, COVID-19.

Then, out of nowhere another wave hit us, May 25th. This time it was the entire country that was under siege. This wave had a name of hate and it came to the forefront in the tragic event of the death of George Floyd. The whole world was watching. I could not believe what I was seeing then the tears began to flow. Within days, all the “monsters” were loose and there were no superheroes to save us. What followed was paralyzing; the ugly demon of hate took its stand and this country, and others across the world, were ablaze. There was so much pain, properties were burning, there were looting, and hundreds of thousands of angry people in the streets marching for justice. A little girl on her dad’s shoulder saying, “My daddy is going to change the world”, was shown over and over again on television and seen around the world.  Little did she know how powerful those words were.

The week before our lives were turned upside down, the sixth season of “Why Catholic?” ended. Since our next season would not begin until October 4th, 2020, almost seven months, the group suggested that we find a spiritual bridge to tide us over until then. The closing of the church and the events of the past few days left us downhearted. We needed something to lift us up as our faith was being tested. In times of doubt, fear, and uncertainty, where do we go? For me it is to the foot of the Cross; you see, there is where our Father Changed the World.   The Spirit led me to call our Parish coordinator, who suggested that we explore the book “Rediscover the Saints” by Matthew Kelly from Dynamic Catholic.

The first Saint of which I knew nothing about, left me most humbled after reading the prologue. His story was a heartbreaker. Abandoned and left to fend for himself when he was only five years old; Dismas turned to a life of crime, stealing, breaking the law, and hurting people.  He never liked doing these things, but that was the only way he could live. Even when he was old enough to work, no one would hire him.  Meeting Jesus’ eyes he felt love and compassion such as he had never felt before from any human being, and there on that hill, on the cross, Jesus Changed His WorldYou see he was the thief that was granted forgiveness, and a place in God’s Kingdom, Saint Dismas, Amazing Possibilities!

Rediscovering the Saints had several other amazing stories that helped us to realize that saints are ordinary people too.  I always thought them to be mysterious, pious, and godly. After reading with the group and all the discussions that went on, I do believe that there are many saints still to be discovered. We will continue to read about the saints and hopefully, on our journey recognize and discover some saints in our community.

Submitted by: Daisy Frankson, Kevin & Debbie Williams, Collin & Bernice Retemeyer, Patrick and Cynthia Bernadine, Jean Morris, Joan Williams (Parish of St Vincent Ferrer)

A Call to Personal Accompaniment in the Family Through the Lens of Catechesis

by Christian Rada

The theme of pastoral accompaniment has been extensively discussed in the life of the church for several years. In Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis points out to the personal accompaniment in the process of growth. He writes, “ordained ministers and other pastoral workers can make present the fragrance of Christ’s closeness and his personal gaze. The Church will have to initiate everyone – priests, religious and laity – into this “art of accompaniment” which teaches us to remove our sandals before the sacred ground of the other (cf. Ex 3:5). The pace of this accompaniment must be steady and reassuring, reflecting our closeness and our compassionate gaze which also heals, liberates, and encourages growth in the Christian life.” (EG 169) What does this mean to the family life and how does this accompaniment play out in the family’s daily life?

The COVID pandemic has affected many families in a unique way like never before. Families have learned to navigate technology and distance learning.  They have also been relying on technology, including video chatting, to stay connected with grandparents and friends. This has directed families to become more creative in their ways of sharing and teaching the gospel message. We have seen many families develop new ways and activities to foster a dynamic approach to family formation and catechesis. Nevertheless, their focus has never changed. These creative ways of view at the center of the family is Christ himself.

By way of catechesis, the family has turned from viewing catechesis as not just passing on information, but as formation which leads to transformation. The aim of family catechesis is that parents become so strong in their own faith and knowledge that they naturally shared it with their children. In other words, parents and guardians become not just teachers of the faith but more importantly witnesses of the faith.

How does becoming a witness of the faith lead us to personal accompaniment? The premise of religious education for a child, especially in the home, is to know that the child is loved by God and is part of the family. The child experiences that love through the actions that are expressed by the family as a whole. It is the responsibility of the family to be examples of authentic love that a child will see and experience.

What are some ways that families can develop and foster a personal family catechesis? First, understanding your roles as parents and guardians in the faith. Parents need to know the faith in order to share. How can a person give what they do not first have? How are you help your family members “meet Jesus”? How are they growing in “grace and wisdom” (Lk. 2:52) during the years you have them under your roof? Do your children see you taking the time to pray and grow in your faith? The habits and attitudes you model are the most important ones in your child’s life and make the most impact especially in matters of religion. Second, what is your attitude to faith? Your attitude can make a world of difference to your children. Weekly class attendance, family discussions about what was covered in class, and general attitudes on going to Mass, praying together, and involvement in the parish have an effect on your child. Third, pray daily for holiness in your family and for the spiritual needs of your parish community. Intercessory prayer is a lost tradition in the family life. Making time to intentionally praying for one other as a family can provide key moments of encountering Christ at a personal level and at a familial level.

STATEMENT FROM BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO ON FEDERAL LAWSUIT COURT DECISION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 16, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
646-241-9805
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

STATEMENT FROM BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO ON FEDERAL LAWSUIT COURT DECISION

 

The Diocese of Brooklyn is extremely disappointed by today’s ruling, as we believe we presented a strong case in support of our right to worship. It is a shame our parishioners in the red zones cannot return to Mass when the judge acknowledged we have done everything right. We are now considering our appellate options.

There is nothing more important than the safety of our parishioners. That is why we have worked diligently to implement strict COVID-19 safety rules that go above and beyond state requirements. We will continue to require masks to be worn in order to participate in all our services. We will continue to voluntarily limit capacity in all buildings to 25% occupancy, and we will abide by social distancing guidelines as required.  The proof of our compliance is the fact that we have not had any COVID outbreaks or significant cases in either our churches or schools. We continue to evaluate our procedures to build upon the safety we have so far achieved.

It is unfortunate the court has ruled against us, and as we will abide by these restrictions, the churches in the red zones are closed until further notice. The Mass attendance limits of 10 people are extremely difficult to implement because we never want to turn away worshippers. It is unfortunate that our inalienable constitutional right to worship is still impeded despite the efforts we have made.

Despite this loss, we will continue to press our leaders for policies that consider the individual circumstances of houses of worship. We will also continue to advocate for places of worship to be classified as essential, for there is nothing more necessary today than a community of believers, united in prayer, asking the Lord to end this pandemic.

 

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FUTURES IN EDUCATION CATHOLIC SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP DINNER VIRTUALLY MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 15, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

FUTURES IN EDUCATION CATHOLIC SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP DINNER VIRTUALLY MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER

            The Diocese of Brooklyn is announcing the Annual Futures in Education Scholarship Fund Dinner will take place next Tuesday, October 20, 2020, for the first time ever virtually, with all proceeds to support the financially disadvantaged students attending, or applying to, Catholic grammar schools and academies in Brooklyn and Queens.

 This year’s Mistress of Ceremonies will be a longtime Futures supporter and the co-host of Fox 5 NY’s Good Day New YorkRosanna Scotto. Two members of the Board of Trustees, who have served since the program’s inception in 1989, John A. Loconsolo and Joseph M. Mattone, Sr., will share their testimonial of their long-standing commitment.

During the past 2019-2020 school year, Futures in Education awarded over $7.5 million in scholarships to more than 5,000 students. Additionally, due to the Coronavirus pandemic and the devastating economic effect, an additional $900,000 was raised and awarded to over 1,000 families in need through the COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund.

Monsignor Jamie Gigantiello, Vicar for Development for the Diocese of Brooklyn, stated, “Since our dinner last year, so much has changed and our need has grown so much larger.  This year, while surely in a different fashion, we continue to ask for the support of our loyal donors, and of new ones, to achieve our mission. With your help, we will continue to break down any economic barriers that stand in the way of a highly-valued Catholic education.”

The featured parent speaker for the evening will be Chere Dyal, who has benefitted from the Futures in Education’s Angel Program since 2017 when a degenerative disorder that affected her Cornea and vision forced her to stop working. Through the efforts of Futures in Education and their Angel Donor Program, Chere’s children have been able to continue their Catholic education despite the unexpected financial hardship.

“I honestly believe that my children are going to do amazing because they attended Catholic school. Futures in Education really builds the foundation for the children’s future,” said Chere Dyal whose two children are on track to graduate from a Queens Catholic grammar school in June 2021.

To view the live stream or donate to support this year’s Futures in Education Virtual Gala, individuals are invited to visit www.futuresineducation.org, or text, FIE20 to 76278. To participate in the live Angel Auction on October 20th, from 7 PM to 8 PM, supporters can contribute via text or by calling (718) 965-7394.

Since its inception, Futures in Education has awarded over $120 million to over 32,000 students.

 

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HEARING SET FOR THURSDAY IN LAWSUIT FILED BY THE DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN AGAINST GOVERNOR CUOMO

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 14, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

HEARING SET FOR THURSDAY IN LAWSUIT FILED BY THE DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN AGAINST GOVERNOR CUOMO

 

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn today announced that its request for an expedited hearing in the federal lawsuit filed against Governor Andrew Cuomo last week has been granted.

 

Judge Nicholas Garaufis has ruled in favor of an expedited hearing seeking a preliminary injunction to re-open 28 Brooklyn and Queens churches located in the red and orange zones. The hearing is scheduled for tomorrow, Thursday, October 15, 2020, at 2:00 p.m.

 

“I am pleased that our case will move forward because going to Church should absolutely be considered essential. We should not be grouped with non-essential services like theaters and recreational facilities. Especially when you consider that we have been operating safely for months at a 25% capacity and have not had any issues because our faithful know that only with a mask can they attend Mass as well as strict adherence to all of our social distancing protocols,” said The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn. “I am hopeful we will not have to close or turn people away in the 28 churches in the red and orange zones. All we are seeking is for our faithful of Brooklyn and Queens to be allowed back to Church and the ability to receive the Holy Eucharist.”

 

“We look forward to presenting our case to Judge Garaufis, demonstrating that the Diocese has done everything right to provide a safe, COVID-free environment for worship and should therefore be permitted to reopen its churches for Mass this coming Sunday,” said Randy Mastro, a partner in the New York office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher who is representing the Diocese.

 

The decision by Governor Cuomo to reduce capacity at churches in the red and orange zones was announced last week without prior notification. The Diocese of Brooklyn immediately filed a lawsuit against this Executive Order on the grounds of religious freedom. The Diocese has also highlighted the safety protocols established since churches reopened on July 4th weekend, which have effectively prevented the spread of the Coronavirus in their parishes.

 

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LIFE OF CATHOLIC SAINT HONORED: BISHOP DIMARZIO CITES NEW MOTHER CABRINI STATUE AS INSPIRATION TO CARE FOR EACH OTHER

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 10, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

LIFE OF CATHOLIC SAINT HONORED: BISHOP DIMARZIO CITES NEW MOTHER CABRINI STATUE AS INSPIRATION TO CARE FOR EACH OTHER

The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, this afternoon joined Governor Andrew Cuomo and fellow members of the Mother Cabrini Memorial Commission at the official statue dedication in honor of the life and service of Mother Frances Cabrini. The sculpture was unveiled at a ceremony in Battery Park City, behind the Museum of Jewish Heritage, where the statue now stands overlooking the New York Harbor and the Statue of Liberty. The statue was designed by Jill and Giancarlo Biagi.

 

“I am so happy that there were so many people who supported this effort and I am happy with the unique design which shows Mother Cabrini in motion and taking care of children.  I know for the artists it was a work of passion, and this statue does her justice. We hope that people who visit this memorial will recognize that history should be repeated, that there was a care for the outcast and marginalized which Mother Cabrini understood, and we need that same care today. This is not just history, we want to make history with a new understanding of how we take care of people,” said Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, the Co-Chairman of the Mother Cabrini Memorial Commission.

 

Last year, Mother Frances Cabrini received the most nominations in the “She Built NYC” competition, but was not selected for a statue to be built in her honor. The program was designed to create more statues throughout the five boroughs honoring women.

 

At the time, Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio organized an effort to raise funds and public support to get her statue built in spite of the City’s decision. Last year at the New York City Columbus Day parade, Bishop DiMarzio rode aboard a float with a statue of Mother Cabrini which was cheered along the entire parade route. At the conclusion of the parade, Governor Cuomo announced New York State’s commitment to work with the Columbus Citizens Foundation and the Diocese of Brooklyn, to ensure Mother Cabrini was permanently honored.

 

“This statue of Mother Cabrini recognizes both her contributions as an Italian immigrant woman, as well as those of all Italian American and immigrant women. She is a shining symbol of what it means to care for the other person, the sick, the uneducated, the economically challenged and the stranger, always putting the needs of society’s most vulnerable above her own. I hope that people will see this heroic statue, ask questions, learn about her outstanding life and work to imitate it as we all build New York’s future together,” said John Leo Heyer II, a member of the Mother Cabrini Memorial Commission.

Mother Cabrini was born in Italy and immigrated to the United States in 1889.  Through her efforts, she would go on to establish 67 hospitals and schools and orphanages. In 1946, she was canonized a saint by Pope Pius XII in recognition of her service to all people. She was named the Patroness of Immigrants in 1950.

The Diocese of Brooklyn has also raised funds to pay for the construction of a Mother Cabrini monument in Brooklyn. Those project details will be announced at a later date.

 

Photos attached courtesy of DeSales Media Group.

 

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STATEMENT FROM BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO ON FEDERAL LAWSUIT COURT DECISION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 10, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

 

STATEMENT FROM BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO

ON FEDERAL LAWSUIT COURT DECISION

 

We are disappointed by last night’s initial ruling, but this is only the beginning of the case, and we expect ultimately to prevail. We are seeking what is just. And we have kept parishioners safe and will continue to do so. Thus, there is no reason for this latest interference with our First Amendment right to celebrate Mass together, so we will continue to press the courts and our elected officials to end it as soon as possible.

We are left with no choice but, for now, to abide by the new restrictions that limit Mass attendance to 10 people in the red zones and 25 in the orange zones. But we will continue to fight to vindicate our fundamental constitutional rights, and we will continue to be a model for safety in our religious community. And by doing right and being right, we will prevail.

 

As the leader of the Diocese of Brooklyn, I have a sacred duty to spiritually provide for all parishioners, mothers, fathers, and our children who attend church. We filed this lawsuit in the name of the 1.5 million Catholics who worship in our Diocese, who celebrate Mass in 33 languages, and come from a diverse tapestry of ethnicities, races, and nationalities so that we could all keep our right to pray in church as one community of believers. Last night’s initial decision is a sad day for our Church community, but we will not let it deter us from our faith.

 

I ask all Catholics to join me in continued prayer for the end of this terrible virus.

 

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The Decision is attached.

TRO_Decision