DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN ANNOUNCES INDEPENDENT RECONCILIATION AND COMPENSATION PROGRAM FOR SURVIVORS OF CLERGY SEXUAL ABUSE

 

Bishop DiMarzio’s video statement: https://vimeo.com/user67990217/brooklyndiocese-ircp

Bishop DiMarzio’s written statement: http://dioceseofbrooklyn.org/bishop-dimarzios-written-statement-ircp/

For Spanish click here

The Diocese of Brooklyn is announcing a significant step in its ongoing response to the sexual abuse of minors by members of the clergy. The Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program (IRCP) will allow survivors of sexual abuse by priests or deacons of the Diocese to seek financial compensation. Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio is implementing the voluntary program in Brooklyn and Queens to promote healing and to bring some element of closure.

“I am well aware that no amount of money will ever heal the scars of abuse, but this compensation program is a concrete expression of our contrition and our desire to make amends,” Bishop DiMarzio said in a video statement announcing the IRCP. (Read Bishop DiMarzio’s written statement here)

How the Program Works
The Diocese of Brooklyn’s IRCP will be administered by renowned settlement administrators and compensation experts Kenneth R. Feinberg and Camille S. Biros. Modeled after a program launched last October by the Archdiocese of New York, Feinberg and Biros will have total independence in determining compensation for survivors, and the Diocese will abide by their decisions. To further ensure public confidence in the IRCP, the Independent Oversight Committee has been established. Retired NYPD First Deputy Commissioner Joseph P. Dunne, retired New York State Supreme Court Justice Joseph G. Golia, and former president of the Queens Chapter of the American Psychiatric Association Dr. Barbara L. Ponieman have agreed to serve on this committee. Commissioner Dunne, Justice Golia and Dr. Ponieman have reviewed and approved the program’s protocol and will oversee its implementation and administration. The decisions made by Feinberg and Biros will not, however, be subject to appeal and cannot be overturned by the committee or the Diocese.

“We commend Bishop DiMarzio and the Brooklyn Diocese for their decision to implement the Brooklyn IRCP,” Feinberg said. “The Brooklyn Program continues the successful implementation of our work with the New York Archdiocese for which we have made payments to over 120 eligible individuals. We look forward to working with the Diocese and the Independent Oversight Committee.”

Policy on Reporting Abuse and Issues of Confidentiality
The Diocese of Brooklyn reports all claims of sexual abuse against a minor, irrespective of when the alleged abuse occurred, to the appropriate law enforcement agencies including the local district attorney.

Along with law enforcement authorities, the Diocese understands the importance of protecting the identity of victims of sexual abuse. To that end, the Diocese and the IRCP will respect the privacy of participants. However, participants themselves will not be bound by any type of confidentiality agreement and are free to discuss any and all aspects of their case and the compensation they may receive with anyone they wish.

Continued Victim Outreach
The Diocese of Brooklyn’s Office of Victim Assistance will continue all of its past efforts to support victims, such as paying the cost of therapy provided by independent professionals who are unaffiliated with the Church, offering various support groups, providing monthly prayer groups, and holding our annual Mass of Hope and Healing. Bishop DiMarzio will continue to listen to and be guided by the Diocese of Brooklyn’s Survivors Advisory Committee, whose members were victims of clergy abuse, in developing new ways to respond to the needs of victims.

Victim Response to the IRCP
Anthony Hughes, 41, came forward in 2006 to report being abused by a priest in the Diocese of Brooklyn in the 1980s. Hughes says at first the Church was unsupportive and he felt that he was not believed, but in recent years there has been a significant shift. “This Bishop [DiMarzio] is listening to survivors. People need to know that the Church is moving in the right direction.” Today, Hughes is a member of the Survivors Advisory Committee and speaks publicly about his story.

Funding the IRCP
The Diocese will take out a loan to pay for the cost of compensating survivors. Donations given by the faithful in support of parishes, schools, charitable works, ministries, apostolates, and the Generations of Faith fundraising campaign will not be used to fund the IRCP.

How to File a Claim
The Diocese has already begun reaching out to survivors who have previously reported abuse by a diocesan clergy member. These known survivors are invited to participate in Phase I of the IRCP. In the next few days, these individuals will be receiving further information by mail from Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros with details about the IRCP process and instructions for submitting a claim. (The deadline for filing a claim in Phase I of the IRCP isSeptember 30, 2017.)

Those who may come forward with a previously unreported allegation of abuse will be eligible to participate in Phase II by first registering through the program’s website to receive information for Phase II when it becomes available.

To learn more about the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program and for information on how to file a claim, go to www.BrooklynDiocese-IRCP.com or call toll free 855-796-3463.

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DIÓCESIS DE BROOKLYN ANUNCIA FONDO INDEPENDIENTE DE RECONCILIACIÓN Y COMPENSACIÓN PARA SOBREVIVIENTES DE ABUSO SEXUAL POR PARTE DEL CLERO

22 de junio, 2017 – La Diócesis de Brooklyn realizó un anuncio importante relacionado a sus continuos esfuerzos por responder a los casos de abuso sexual de menores por parte de integrantes del clero. La diócesis establecerá el Programa Independiente de Reconciliación y Compensación (IRCP por sus siglas en inglés), que permitirá a todos los sobrevivientes de abuso sexual por parte de sacerdotes o diáconos de la diócesis reclamar compensación monetaria. El monseñor Nicholas DiMarzio, obispo de Brooklyn, ha decidido implementar este programa voluntario en Brooklyn y Queens, para promover la sanación de las víctimas y ayudar a poner fin a la traumática experiencia.

“Entiendo bien que ninguna cantidad de dinero borrará jamás las cicatrices del abuso, pero este programa de compensación es una expresión concreta de nuestra contrición y nuestro deseo de reparar el daño causado”, dijo el monseñor DiMarzio en el vídeo en que anunció la creación del programa IRCP. (Para leer el mensaje del monseñor DiMarzio, haz click aquí.)

Detalles del programa

El programa IRCP de la Diócesis de Brooklyn será administrado por los renombrados expertos en administración de acuerdos y compensaciones, Kenneth R. Feinberg y Camille S. Biros. Tomando como modelo el programa establecido en octubre pasado por la Arquidiócesis de Nueva York, Feinberg y Biros tendrán independencia total para determinar la compensación para los sobrevivientes, y la diócesis acatará sus decisiones. Para reforzar la confianza pública en el programa IRCP, se ha establecido un Comité Supervisor Independiente. El ex Sub Comisionado del Departamento de Policía de la Ciudad de Nueva York (NYPD), Joseph P. Dunne, el juez retirado de la Corte Suprema del Estado de Nueva York, Joseph G. Golia, y la ex presidenta de la Asociación Americana de Psiquiatría, Capítulo de Queens, la doctora Barbara L. Ponieman, han aceptado formar parte del comité. El comisionado Dunne, el juez Golia y la doctora Ponieman han revisado y aprobado los protocolos del programa, y supervisarán su implementación y administración. Las decisiones que tomen Feinberg y Biros serán inapelables, y no podrán ser anuladas por el comité ni por la diócesis.

“Felicitamos al monseñor DiMarzio y a la Diócesis de Brooklyn por la decisión de implementar el programa IRCP de Brooklyn”, dijo Feinberg. “El programa de Brooklyn es una continuación de la exitosa implementación de nuestro programa en la Arquidiócesis de Nueva York, mediante el cual hemos hecho pagos a 120 personas. Esperamos con ansia comenzar nuestra colaboración con la diócesis y el Comité Supervisor Independiente”.

Proceso para reportar abusos y normas de privacidad

La Diócesis de Brooklyn reporta todas las acusaciones de abuso sexual contra menores a las autoridades correspondientes, incluso al fiscal del distrito, sin importar cuándo haya ocurrido el presunto abuso.

En consonancia con las fuerzas del orden, la diócesis entiende la importancia de proteger la identidad de las víctimas de abuso sexual. Con ese fin, la diócesis y el programa IRCP respetarán la privacidad de los participantes. Sin embargo, los participantes mismos no estarán sujetos a ningún acuerdo de confidencialidad y podrán hablar sobre cualquier aspecto de su caso y la compensación que pudieran recibir con quien deseen hacerlo.

Apoyo continuo a las víctimas

La Oficina de la Diócesis de Brooklyn de Ayuda a las Víctimas de Abuso Sexual continuará todos los esfuerzos que ha venido realizando para apoyar a las víctimas, entre ellos el pago de terapias provistas por profesionales independientes que no estén afiliados a la Iglesia. También seguirá ofreciendo varios grupos de apoyo y grupos de oración mensual, y continuará celebrando cada año la Misa de la Esperanza. El monseñor DiMarzio seguirá recibiendo y escuchando las orientaciones del Comité Asesor de Sobrevivientes de la Diócesis de Brooklyn, cuyos integrantes fueron víctimas de abuso por parte de clérigos, para buscar nuevos modos de responder a las necesidades de las víctimas.

Respuesta de las víctimas al programa IRCP

Anthony Hughes, de 41 años de edad, reportó en 2006 que había sido abusado sexualmente por un sacerdote en la Diócesis de Brooklyn en los años ochenta. Hughes dice que inicialmente la Iglesia no lo escuchó, pero que en años recientes ha habido un cambio significativo. “Este obispo escucha a los sobrevivientes. La gente debe saber que la Iglesia se está moviendo en la dirección correcta”. Hoy Hughes es integrante del Comité Asesor de Sobrevivientes y habla públicamente sobre su historia.

Financiación del programa IRCP

La Diócesis de Brooklyn pedirá un préstamo para cubrir los costos de compensación de los sobrevivientes. La diócesis no usará dinero que donen los fieles para apoyar a sus parroquias, escuelas, obras benéficas, ministerios y apostolados, o a la campaña de recaudación de fondos Generations of Faith.

Cómo hacer un reclamo

La diócesis ya ha comenzado a contactar a los sobrevivientes que reportaron anteriormente casos de abuso cometidos por integrantes del clero diocesano. Estos sobrevivientes de quienes ya se tenía conocimiento están invitados a participar en la Fase I del programa IRCP. En los próximos días estas personas recibirán información más detallada de parte de Feinberg y Biros sobre el proceso IRCP, y sobre cómo hacer sus reclamos. (La fecha límite para enviar reclamos en la Fase I del programa IRCP es el 30 de septiembre del 2017.)

Quienes deseen informar sobre casos de abuso que no han sido reportados hasta este momento, podrán participar en la Fase II inscribiéndose primero en el programa a través del portal web del mismo, para recibir la información pertinente sobre la Fase II cuando esté disponible.

Para obtener más información sobre el Programa Independiente de Reconciliación y Compensación, o información sobre cómo hacer un reclamo, visite el portal web www.BrooklynDiocese-IRCP.com o llame gratis al 855-796-3463.

Vídeo del mensaje del obispo DiMarzio

Texto escrito del mensaje del obispo DiMarzio

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Independent Reconciliation And Compensation Program

For Spanish click here

DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN ANNOUNCES INDEPENDENT RECONCILIATION AND COMPENSATION PROGRAM FOR SURVIVORS OF CLERGY SEXUAL ABUSE

The Diocese of Brooklyn is announcing a significant step in its ongoing response to the sexual abuse of minors by members of the clergy. The Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program (IRCP) will allow survivors of sexual abuse by priests or deacons of the Diocese to seek financial compensation. Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio is implementing the voluntary program in Brooklyn and Queens to promote healing and to bring some element of closure.

“I am well aware that no amount of money will ever heal the scars of abuse, but this compensation program is a concrete expression of our contrition and our desire to make amends,” Bishop DiMarzio said in a video statement announcing the IRCP. (Read Bishop DiMarzio’s written statement here)

How the Program Works
The Diocese of Brooklyn’s IRCP will be administered by renowned settlement administrators and compensation experts Kenneth R. Feinberg and Camille S. Biros. Modeled after a program launched last October by the Archdiocese of New York, Feinberg and Biros will have total independence in determining compensation for survivors, and the Diocese will abide by their decisions. To further ensure public confidence in the IRCP, the Independent Oversight Committee has been established. Retired NYPD First Deputy Commissioner Joseph P. Dunne, retired New York State Supreme Court Justice Joseph G. Golia, and former president of the Queens Chapter of the American Psychiatric Association Dr. Barbara L. Ponieman have agreed to serve on this committee. Commissioner Dunne, Justice Golia and Dr. Ponieman have reviewed and approved the program’s protocol and will oversee its implementation and administration. The decisions made by Feinberg and Biros will not, however, be subject to appeal and cannot be overturned by the committee or the Diocese.

“We commend Bishop DiMarzio and the Brooklyn Diocese for their decision to implement the Brooklyn IRCP,” Feinberg said. “The Brooklyn Program continues the successful implementation of our work with the New York Archdiocese for which we have made payments to over 120 eligible individuals. We look forward to working with the Diocese and the Independent Oversight Committee.”

Policy on Reporting Abuse and Issues of Confidentiality
The Diocese of Brooklyn reports all claims of sexual abuse against a minor, irrespective of when the alleged abuse occurred, to the appropriate law enforcement agencies including the local district attorney.

Along with law enforcement authorities, the Diocese understands the importance of protecting the identity of victims of sexual abuse. To that end, the Diocese and the IRCP will respect the privacy of participants. However, participants themselves will not be bound by any type of confidentiality agreement and are free to discuss any and all aspects of their case and the compensation they may receive with anyone they wish.

Continued Victim Outreach
The Diocese of Brooklyn’s Office of Victim Assistance will continue all of its past efforts to support victims, such as paying the cost of therapy provided by independent professionals who are unaffiliated with the Church, offering various support groups, providing monthly prayer groups, and holding our annual Mass of Hope and Healing. Bishop DiMarzio will continue to listen to and be guided by the Diocese of Brooklyn’s Survivors Advisory Committee, whose members were victims of clergy abuse, in developing new ways to respond to the needs of victims.

Victim Response to the IRCP
Anthony Hughes, 41, came forward in 2006 to report being abused by a priest in the Diocese of Brooklyn in the 1980s. Hughes says at first the Church was unsupportive and he felt that he was not believed, but in recent years there has been a significant shift. “This Bishop [DiMarzio] is listening to survivors. People need to know that the Church is moving in the right direction.” Today, Hughes is a member of the Survivors Advisory Committee and speaks publicly about his story.

Funding the IRCP
The Diocese will take out a loan to pay for the cost of compensating survivors. Donations given by the faithful in support of parishes, schools, charitable works, ministries, apostolates, and the Generations of Faith fundraising campaign will not be used to fund the IRCP.

How to File a Claim
The Diocese has already begun reaching out to survivors who have previously reported abuse by a diocesan clergy member. These known survivors are invited to participate in Phase I of the IRCP. In the next few days, these individuals will be receiving further information by mail from Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros with details about the IRCP process and instructions for submitting a claim. (The deadline for filing a claim in Phase I of the IRCP is September 30, 2017.)

Those who may come forward with a previously unreported allegation of abuse will be eligible to participate in Phase II by first registering through the program’s website to receive information for Phase II when it becomes available.

To learn more about the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program and for information on how to file a claim, go to www.BrooklynDiocese-IRCP.com or call toll free 855-796-3463.

View Bishop DiMarzio’s video statement.

Read Bishop DiMarzio’s written statement.

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STATEMENT FROM BISHOP DIMARZIO ON THE IRCP

I am announcing a significant new step in the ongoing effort of the Diocese of Brooklyn to address the wounds of those sexually abused by members of the clergy. It is called the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program (IRCP). It is one more way our diocese, which serves Brooklyn and Queens, can acknowledge the harm that was done by those who were priests or deacons and show our solidarity with survivors.  Our Program is modeled after the program recently launched by the Archdiocese of New York. Compensation decisions will be made by Kenneth R. Feinberg who administered numerous high-profile compensation programs, including the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, the compensation fund for the victims of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, served as a mediator for sexual abuse cases for Penn State University and administered many other corporate and charitable independent compensation programs. Mr. Feinberg will have total independence in his decisions.

Throughout my time as a diocesan bishop, first in Camden and then in Brooklyn and Queens, I have met with more than 50 survivors.  It is difficult to hear about the pain caused by the criminal behavior of members of the clergy.  I am well aware that no amount of money will ever heal the scars of abuse, but this program is a concrete expression of our contrition and our desire to make amends. We hope it will help with the healing process and bring survivors some element of healing.

The Diocese of Brooklyn will continue all of our past efforts to support survivors.  Those efforts include paying the cost of therapy provided by independent professionals who are unaffiliated with the Church, offering various support groups, providing monthly prayer groups, and holding our annual Mass of Hope and Healing.

Four years ago, survivors of clergy abuse in the Diocese of Brooklyn formed a “Survivors Advisory Committee.”  This program, along with all of our outreach efforts, has been discussed with this group of survivors.  I will continue to listen to and be guided by these survivors in developing new ways to respond to the needs of victims.

I wish to assure every parishioner and every donor to our diocese in Brooklyn and Queens that not a penny of their contributions or bequests will go toward compensating victims of abuse. The Diocese will take out a loan to cover for the cost, and pay it back with rental income. The Diocese will not use money given by the faithful to support parishes, schools, charitable works, ministries, apostolates, or the Generations of Faith fundraising campaign. The financial burden will rightly be felt by the central diocesan administration.

In accordance with our diocesan policy, any and all claims of sexual misconduct against a minor have been reported to the district attorney. Any new allegations that come to light through this program will be also be reported to the DA and any other appropriate law enforcement authorities.

We understand the importance of protecting the identity of victims of sexual abuse.   To that end, the Diocese of Brooklyn will respect the privacy of participants in the IRCP. However, we want to make it very clear that under the protocols of the Dallas Charter, passed by the Bishops of the United States in 2002, participants themselves will not be bound by any type of confidentiality agreement.  Participants are free to discuss any and all aspects of their case and the compensation they may receive with anyone they wish.

We will never stop working toward reform, reparation, and reconciliation. Here in the Diocese of Brooklyn, we re-affirm our commitment to the protection of children, as we walk in solidarity with survivors of abuse in their journey toward wholeness.

STATEMENT ON MIDDLE VILLAGE PREPARATORY CHARTER SCHOOL AND CHRIST THE KING HIGH SCHOOL

The Diocese of Brooklyn supports the parents and students of Middle Village Preparatory Charter School (MVP). The diocese wants the school to remain open and its students to continue to thrive. We hope to resolve the ongoing dispute that threatens the school’s future.

We would like parents, students and the public at large to understand the nature of this dispute. Read more »

10 Men To Be Ordained As Priests In The Diocese Of Brooklyn

On Saturday, June 3, at 11 a.m., Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio will ordain 10 men to the priesthood for the Diocese of Brooklyn. Once again this year, the diocese ranks among the top in the country in the number of new priests. The ordination Mass will take place at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph, 856 Pacific Street in Brooklyn.

The new priests, who come from all over the world, will add to the rich cultural diversity of the diocese. Three were born in Brooklyn, two in Poland, two in Nigeria, one in South Korea, one in Cameroon, and one in Italy. The men range in age from 26 to 42. The group is the third largest to join a diocese or Archdiocese in the United States in 2017. The Diocese of Patterson will ordain the biggest class of 13 priests while the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis will ordain 11.

The priests join the Diocese of Brooklyn with degrees ranging from Theology and Divinity to Latin, Philosophy, and Literature. They bring with them experience ranging from social work to mapmaking to rock music. In discerning God’s call to serve the Church, the men found inspiration in prayer, pilgrimage, family, and pastoral role models.

“There is no greater joy for a bishop than to ordain a man to the priesthood of Jesus Christ,” said Bishop DiMarzio. “This Saturday, we in Brooklyn and Queens will be fortunate to have ten more men who will perpetuate the great Sacrifice of Christ on Calvary. In a world that rejects sacrifice and embraces self indulgence, I am grateful for the courage of these men who offer their own lives for the sake of the proclamation of the Gospel.”

The Diocese of Brooklyn, the eighth largest diocese in the United States and the only entirely urban diocese in the Nation, serves the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. The combined population of the boroughs stands at 4.8 million residents, of which more than 1.5 million identify themselves as Catholics.

The diocesan network New Evangelization Television (NET TV) will provide live coverage of the ordination ceremony, which will also be streamed live on www.netny.tv. NET TV is a cable network featuring news and information with a Catholic point of view, and is available in the New York area on Time Warner Cable, Channel 97; Cablevision, Channel 30; Verizon FiOS, Ch. 48; and nationally on Verizon FiOS On Demand.

Both Pacific Street and Dean Street, between Underhill Street and Vanderbilt Avenue, will be closed to traffic from 12 a.m. on Saturday through the end of the event.

For photos and full bios, please visit this week’s Tablet.

STATEMENT ON CHRIST THE KING CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL AND MIDDLE VILLAGE PREPARATORY CHARTER SCHOOL

Dear Parents and Students,

I am writing to clear up some misinformation that was disseminated by the administrations of Christ The King Catholic High School and Middle Village Preparatory Charter School. Letters sent home to students and parents indicated that the Diocese of Brooklyn is ordering the closure of Middle Village Prep. This is a misrepresentation of the truth and we at the diocese feel it is our obligation to clarify the facts.

The Diocese of Brooklyn believes in education, both parochial and public. Multiple charter schools currently utilize or share space in Catholic high school and parish buildings throughout the Diocese with the full support of the Church. We wish to see all of these schools, including Middle Village Prep, continue to thrive. But the power to keep Middle Village Prep open lies with Christ the King High School.

In recent years Christ the King has refused to re-affirm and honor its long-standing covenant with the Diocese of Brooklyn—a covenant that is honored by all other Catholic regional high schools in the Diocese. This covenant requires that these high schools operate in consultation with the Diocese when conducting enterprises unrelated to their function as Catholic schools.

After years of unsuccessful efforts to work in cooperation with Christ the King High School, the Diocese of Brooklyn was left with no other recourse but to file a lawsuit. In March of 2017, and after several years of litigation, the Supreme Court ruled that use of the premises for the operation of a charter school is a breach of Christ the King’s agreement with the Diocese. The court ordered Christ the King to discontinue the use of the premises for a charter school without the permission of the Diocese, effective at the end of the current academic year.

The diocese has made it clear to Christ the King that it will permit use of the property for a charter school, hence allowing Middle Village Prep to remain open. The diocese’s sole requirement is that Christ the King adhere to the same conditions accepted by all other Catholic regional high schools and parishes in the diocese.

It is the Diocese of Brooklyn’s fervent hope and prayer that Christ the King will forever continue to serve the young men and women of the Diocese and that the property will continue to serve the most worthy cause of education.

Sincerely yours in Christ,

Bishop James Massa
Diocese of Brooklyn

Newark Archbishop Joseph William Cardinal Tobin to Address Federal Immigration Policy at Brooklyn’s World Communications Day Conference

“A person unbound by Christian charity would say that you really have to believe in inflicting cruelty on innocent people to choose to support the policies [on immigration] we’ve seen in recent months while possessing the power to change the law.” – Joseph William Cardinal Tobin, Archbishop of Newark

On Wednesday, May 17, beginning at 9:30 a.m., the Diocese of Brooklyn will hold its 26th Annual World Communications Day Catholic Media Conference. The conference will be held at BRIC House, 647 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY, 11217. Read more »

Bishop Thomas V. Daily Dies at 89

“Bishop Daily was a man who personified the Second Vatican Council’s call for a preferential option for the poor. He ministered to indigenous people amidst poverty in Peru, women in crisis pregnancies, as well as new and often poor immigrants living in Brooklyn. He never acted out of malice or to further his own self-interest. At heart he was a missionary. I suspect he wished he could have remained in the missions his entire life.”  -Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn


MOST REVEREND THOMAS V. DAILY, BISHOP EMERITUS OF BROOKLYN, HAS DIED AT 89 YEARS OLD 

The Most Reverend Thomas Vose Daily, Bishop Emeritus of Brooklyn died overnight at the Immaculate Conception Center’s Bishop Mugavero Residence in Douglaston, Queens. Bishop Daily, served as Bishop of Brooklyn from 1990 until his retirement in 2003.

Bishop Daily was installed as the sixth bishop of the Diocese of Brooklyn, in 1990 and served during a time of racial tension and financial hardship. In his later years, Bishop Daily suffered declining health. Read more »