The Passing of Rev. William R. Dulaney

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend William R. Dulaney, a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, who was ministering as Parochial Vicar of Saint Gregory the Great (Bellerose), as well as Part-time Chaplain of Saint Edmund Preparatory High School (Brooklyn). Father Dulaney was born on February 15, 1948 in Queens, was ordained to the Priesthood on May 26, 1973, and died Friday, February 10, 2017 at Northshore University Hospital, Manhasset.

Father Dulaney served the Diocese of Brooklyn as Pastor of Mary Queen of Heaven (Brooklyn) as well as Parochial Vicar of Saint Thomas the Apostle (Flatlands), Saint Sebastian (Woodside), Saint Margaret (Middle Village), Saint Anselm (Brooklyn), and Saint Mel (Flushing). In addition, Father Dulaney also served as Vice-Rector, Spiritual Director and teacher at Cathedral Preparatory School and Seminary.

The arrangements are as follows: Read more »

Passing of Rev. Msgr. Gerard J. Arella

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend Monsignor Gerard J. Arella, retired senior priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, who was in residence at the Bishop Mugavero Residence. Monsignor Arella was born on September 21, 1928 in Manhattan, New York, was ordained to the Priesthood on May 29, 1954, and died Tuesday, January 31, 2017.

Monsignor Arella served the Diocese of Brooklyn as Pastor of St. Mark (Brooklyn), Parochial Vicar of St. Clement Pope (South Ozone Park) and in residence at Our Lady of Victory (Brooklyn), St. Augustine (Brooklyn) and Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Brooklyn). He was appointed Defender of the Bond and Associate Presiding Judge of the Diocesan Tribunal Office. On September 11, 1989, he was named Prelate of Honor to His Holiness.

The arrangements are as follows: Read more »

Passing of Rev. Msgr. Austin P. Bennet

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend Monsignor Austin P. Bennett, J.C.D., K.G.C.H.S., P.A., an active senior priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn. Monsignor Bennett was born on February 26, 1923 in Brooklyn, New York, was ordained to the Priesthood on June 11, 1949, and died Tuesday, January 31, 2017.

Among his many responsibilities in the Diocese of Brooklyn, Monsignor Bennett served as Parochial Vicar of Saint Saviour (Brooklyn), was appointed to the Diocesan Curia, Director of Parish Service Corporation, Director of Finances, Administrator of the Pension Office, Vicar for Administration, Executive Director Emeritus of the Confraternity of the Precious Blood and Special Assistant to the Bishop. On August 21, 1981, he was named Prelate of Honor to His Holiness and on February 23, 1997 he was named Protonotary Apostolic Supernumerary.

The arrangements are as follows: Read more »

Passing of Rev. Joseph F. Wiseman

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend Joseph F. Wiseman, a retired senior priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, who was in residence at Mary’s Nativity-St. Ann, in Flushing. Father Wiseman was born on October 13, 1923, in Brooklyn, was ordained to the Priesthood on June 7, 1952, and died Sunday, January 29, 2017, at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.

Father Wiseman served the Diocese of Brooklyn as Parochial Vicar of Immaculate Conception (Long Island City), Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Brooklyn), Saint Jerome (Brooklyn) and Holy Family (Flushing).

The arrangements are as follows: Read more »

‘Putting ‘Amoris Laetitia’ Into Practice’ by Bishop DiMarzio

February 22, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

Since the Fourth Century, the Church has celebrated the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter. This celebration gives the Church an opportunity from this most ancient time to recognize the place of the papacy in our Catholic faith.

The Chair, or Cathedra, of St. Peter signifies the teaching authority which Peter and his successors exercises over the life of the Church. The New Testament gives us much to meditate on when we recognize Peter, the Rock, upon whom Christ built His Church because of Peter’s confession of faith when he said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God and the jaws of death, meaning the attacks of the evil one, will not prevail against the Church.”

This reminds us that Peter, in the Petrine Office, is essential to our understanding of the Church. It is truly unfortunate that in divided Christianity today we cannot come to a better agreement about the Petrine Office in the Church in the latitude the various rites have for their internal organization. It is Peter who confirms us in faith and strengthens us. And it is by Christ’s demand that he takes upon himself this mission.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Baby Steps on the March For Life’ by Bishop DiMarzio

January 18, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

Each year on January 22, the Catholic Church in the United States, along with many others, recognizes the anniversary of the flawed Supreme Court decision entitled Roe v Wade. The decision was flawed because it was made on the basis of false information. Two women brought the lawsuit, and later recanted their claims. One said that she was never pregnant, and the other said her pregnancy was not a result of rape as we were previously told. On the basis of false facts, we have seen the massive abortion of over 50 million unborn children since 1973. There was one other flawed Supreme Court decision that fortunately was overturned which was the support of slavery in the United States in the Dred Scott decision.

But why do we commemorate tragic events? Well, it becomes a reminder to us that these events, especially the legalization of abortion in the United States, are injustices that must be overturned. This may not happen all at once. However, any attempt to limit the number of abortions is a step in the right direction. Notwithstanding the present political climate, which might lend some hope to future curtailment of abortion, it is our responsibility as Catholic Christians to work for the elimination of this stain on our national conscience.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Encountering the Strangers Among Us’ by Bishop DiMarzio

January 11, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet.

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

For over 35 years, the first week after the Epiphany, has been designated as National Migration Week. This year it occurred from Jan. 8 to 14. The Church in the United States, recognizing that it has become again an immigrant Church, must understand a new culture that has grown in the Church. This year’s theme, “Creating a Culture of Encounter,” comes from the first Pentecost homily of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, where he emphasizes the importance of encounter in the Christian faith. He says, “For me, this word is very important. Encounter with others. Why? Because faith is an encounter with Jesus and we must do what Jesus does: encounter others.”

The Lord, Jesus, had one pastoral method: encounter and making friends with people. He seemed to have that ability to encounter others and engage them almost immediately in life-changing situations. Jesus called the Apostles from their work and they followed Him; Peter and Andrew and Matthew. He met the Samaritan Woman at the well and engaged in deep conversation with her. He encountered the two disciples on the way to Emmaus and they too had life-changing experiences. Our call to a greater culture of encounter with immigrants follows the mandate of Jesus in the scene of the Last Judgment when He tells us, “Whoever welcomes a stranger, welcomes me.”

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Becoming Artisans of Peace’ by Bishop DiMarizo

January 4, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the beginning of World Day of Peace begun by Pope Paul VI. The Holy Father initiated this day of prayer based on the message of St. John XXIII and his Encyclical, “Pacem in Terris” (“Peace on Earth”). It was the wish of John XXIII that peace would be the prayer at the beginning of each New Year. He said, “Peace is the only true direction of human progress.”

The 20th century gave us two world wars and the threat of nuclear disaster. In our present century, the wars in the Middle East and Africa, as well as terrorism in Europe and in the United States all have truly been a legacy of unpeacefulness.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website

‘Liberty And Justice For All’ by Bishop DiMarzio

November 16, 2016 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

Last week, we went to the polls to elect a new President, as well as legislators and judges. This past week, the winning candidates began the process of transition from campaigning to governing.

President Obama and Secretary Clinton were gracious in their calls for us all to come together as a nation. As President Obama reminded us, “We are all on one team.”

The peaceful transition of power is one of the defining characteristics of our Nation. Yet, since the election, the protests and riots that have erupted not only in our own city, but also in other parts of the country, are deeply troubling.

The fears of some in our community must be acknowledged. Undocumented immigrants and the children of undocumented immigrants fear that they will be deported. The Trump slogan “Make America Great Again” has been adapted by some to become “Make America White Again.” Consequently, many in the African-American community fear a rollback of the many advances made in recent years. Meanwhile, many of the anti-Trump protesters are proponents of anarchy, some even of violence and boldly waving socialist flags in the streets of our cities.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Celebrating 20 years A Bishop’ by Bishop DiMarzio

November 9, 2016 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet.

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

First, I thank you for your presence today as I celebrate 20 years of Episcopal ministry. As I reflect back on these past 20 years, it was certainly a surprise to be asked to accept the episcopacy. When the nuncio of that time, now Cardinal Agostino Cacciavillan, called me and began speaking in Italian and said, “Chiedere niente e rifiutare niente,” which I later realized were the words of Saint Frances deSales, “Ask for nothing and refuse nothing.” Truly, the then-Archbishop Cacciavillan meant that he wanted me to answer yes. Well, I did answer yes, not knowing what lay before me.

Our second reading today was the reading I used in 1970 at my first Mass as a priest. Jesus was a high priest taken from among men. In fact, I had my sister, Donna, who was in high school at that time, make a banner where those words were displayed, “A Man Among Men.”

A priest is taken from among men to serve as their representative before God. Truly, the episcopacy accents this work of a priest. One always remains a priest. The work of the episcopacy is always the work of the priesthood. Sometimes the isolation of the episcopacy can be a burden in itself. The separation from family, friends and priest friends is sometimes difficult, especially if one is serving in a diocese other than one’s home diocese.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.