‘Palm Is A Sign Of Reconciliation’ by Bishop DiMarzio

April 5, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

Palm Sunday, in the liturgical year, is a day when we anticipate the joy of Easter by reenacting the triumphal entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem several days before the beginning of His passion. The symbol of palm is a powerful one. The Gospels describe the people of Jerusalem spreading palm branches on the roads so that Jesus could enter in a regal manner.

The symbol of palm goes deeper into God’s revelation. In the beginning of the book of Genesis, we hear the story of Noah who saves his family from the great flood with the Ark. Towards the end of their ordeal, Noah sends out a dove who on the second time returns to the Ark with a palm or olive branch in his beak. This is the indication of dry land being somewhere within reach. It is a symbol of the peace to be created between God and humanity, thereafter to be symbolized by the rainbow, which is to recall that God would never again destroy the world by water. In the New Testament, the palm branch is portrayed in the Book of the Apocalypse as the symbol of the martyr’s glory and a sign of resurrection.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Palm Is a Sign Of Reconciliation’ by Bishop DiMarzio

April 5, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

Palm Sunday, in the liturgical year, is a day when we anticipate the joy of Easter by reenacting the triumphal entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem several days before the beginning of His passion. The symbol of palm is a powerful one. The Gospels describe the people of Jerusalem spreading palm branches on the roads so that Jesus could enter in a regal manner.

The symbol of palm goes deeper into God’s revelation. In the beginning of the book of Genesis, we hear the story of Noah who saves his family from the great flood with the Ark. Towards the end of their ordeal, Noah sends out a dove who on the second time returns to the Ark with a palm or olive branch in his beak. This is the indication of dry land being somewhere within reach. It is a symbol of the peace to be created between God and humanity, thereafter to be symbolized by the rainbow, which is to recall that God would never again destroy the world by water. In the New Testament, the palm branch is portrayed in the Book of the Apocalypse as the symbol of the martyr’s glory and a sign of resurrection.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Springtime Of The Soul’ by Bishop DiMarzio

March 29, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

As we have begun the season of Lent several weeks ago, I cannot help but comment on what Lent can mean for us. The word Lent comes from an old English word that means spring; therefore, it is not unreasonable to describe Lent as the springtime of the soul, a time of new birth in preparation for the great feast of the Resurrection.

St. Augustine once prayed in these words: “Lord, to cut myself off from You means to die. To return to You means to rise again. To remain with You means to live, to truly live.”

This prayer of Augustine truly can be an outline for a Lenten program. If we separate ourselves from the Lord, we truly die. That separation happens when we sin, when we neglect our spiritual life or when, for so many reasons, God does not become the center of our lives. But, to return, and Lent is a season of return, means to rise again, to begin again, to take a new opportunity to deepen our relationship with the Lord. Truly, to remain in the Lord means to really live, and that is the goal of our Lenten journey, to rise and to remain in the Lord.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Springtime Of The Soul’ by Bishop DiMarzio

March 29, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

As we have begun the season of Lent several weeks ago, I cannot help but comment on what Lent can mean for us. The word Lent comes from an old English word that means spring; therefore, it is not unreasonable to describe Lent as the springtime of the soul, a time of new birth in preparation for the great feast of the Resurrection.

St. Augustine once prayed in these words: “Lord, to cut myself off from You means to die. To return to You means to rise again. To remain with You means to live, to truly live.”

This prayer of Augustine truly can be an outline for a Lenten program. If we separate ourselves from the Lord, we truly die. That separation happens when we sin, when we neglect our spiritual life or when, for so many reasons, God does not become the center of our lives. But, to return, and Lent is a season of return, means to rise again, to begin again, to take a new opportunity to deepen our relationship with the Lord. Truly, to remain in the Lord means to really live, and that is the goal of our Lenten journey, to rise and to remain in the Lord.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s Column on The Tablet website.

Passing of Rev. Matthew J. Pomilio

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend Matthew J. Pomilio, retired senior priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, who was in private residence. Father Pomilio was born on June 21, 1936 in Brooklyn, was ordained to the Priesthood on June 2, 1962, and died Thursday, March 23, 2017, at Ozanam Hall of Queens Nursing Home.

Father Pomilio served the Diocese of Brooklyn as Parochial Vicar of Saint Catherine of Alexandria (Brooklyn), Saint Blaise (Brooklyn), Most Precious Blood (Long Island City), Saint Fortunata (Brooklyn), Holy Name of Jesus (Brooklyn), Saint Rosalia (Brooklyn) and Saint Rita (Brooklyn).

The arrangements are as follows:  Read more »

‘Annunciation Celebrates Mary And Jesus’ by Bishop DiMarzio

March 22, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

This week, we celebrate the Feast of the Annunciation. It is both a Marian Feast and a Feast of Jesus Christ because it is on this day that Mary virginally conceived the Lord Jesus. This feast has always been celebrated as a feast of both Christ and Mary. In fact, in the past it carried the name of the Annunciation of Christ or the Conception of Christ.

Unfortunately, many people confuse the Annunciation with the Immaculate Conception. The Immaculate Conception refers to the privilege of Mary that she was conceived without Original Sin, no sin touched her who was destined to be the Mother of God.

Instead, on the Feast of the Annunciation we remember that the message of the Archangel Gabriel to Mary is that the Holy Spirit would overshadow her and she would give birth to a son, notwithstanding Mary’s objection that she knew not man.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

‘Annunciation Celebrates Mary And Jesus’ by Bishop DiMarzio

March 22, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into The Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

This week, we celebrate the Feast of the Annunciation. It is both a Marian Feast and a Feast of Jesus Christ because it is on this day that Mary virginally conceived the Lord Jesus. This feast has always been celebrated as a feast of both Christ and Mary. In fact, in the past it carried the name of the Annunciation of Christ or the Conception of Christ.

Unfortunately, many people confuse the Annunciation with the Immaculate Conception. The Immaculate Conception refers to the privilege of Mary that she was conceived without Original Sin, no sin touched her who was destined to be the Mother of God.

Instead, on the Feast of the Annunciation we remember that the message of the Archangel Gabriel to Mary is that the Holy Spirit would overshadow her and she would give birth to a son, notwithstanding Mary’s objection that she knew not man.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

Passing of Msgr. Patrick F. O’Toole

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend Monsignor Patrick F. O’Toole, retired senior priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, who was in private residence in Florida. Monsignor O’Toole was born on January 15, 1937 in Galway, Ireland, was ordained to the Priesthood on June 19, 1960, and died Wednesday, March 8, 2017, at NYU Medical Center.

Monsignor O’Toole served the Diocese of Brooklyn as Pastor of Saint Cecilia (Brooklyn), Saint Patrick (Brooklyn), Saint Ann (Brooklyn), and as Parochial Vicar of Saint Kevin (Flushing) and Saint Saviour (Brooklyn). On May 16, 1986, he was named Prelate of Honor to His Holiness.

The arrangements are as follows: Read more »

‘Ensuring The Future Of The Diocese’ by Bishop DiMarzio

March 8, 2017 – Excerpted from Put Out Into the Deep, Bishop DiMarzio’s column in The Tablet:

My dear brothers and sisters in the Lord,

On behalf of the people who are served throughout our Diocese in Brooklyn and Queens, we begin the 2017 Annual Catholic Appeal, “Live in Faith – Give in Love,” by thanking those who generously responded to the 2016 Annual Catholic Appeal and the Generations of Faith capital campaign.

While the Generations of Faith capital campaign is helping to strengthen our parishes, provide for our senior priests and secure the future of the Church through our diocesan youth ministry initiative, the Annual Catholic Appeal continues to support the vital diocesan ministries that serve the people of Brooklyn and Queens on a day-to-day basis. If it were not for the commitment of parishioners throughout the Diocese to the Annual Catholic Appeal each year, the responsibility to provide the basic services and ministries of the Diocese of Brooklyn would be impossible.

The 2017 Annual Catholic Appeal, “Live in Faith – Give in Love,” reminds us that the work of the Church is shared by all believers in response to the gifts of faith and love. By supporting the works of the Diocese and the mission of the Church through a commitment to the Annual Catholic Appeal, you will inspire others in your parish and our diocese to join us as we answer God’s call to love and to serve our neighbors. Those who are without shelter, malnourished, those without access to Catholic education, men discerning the priesthood and those who are ill and dying – all depend upon our generosity.

Read the full text of the Bishop’s column on The Tablet website.

The Passing of Msgr. John J. Brown

Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, regrets to inform you of the death of Reverend Monsignor John J. Brown, a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn ministering as Pastor of Saint. Thomas Aquinas, Flatlands. Monsignor Brown was born on February 22, 1957 in Brooklyn, New York, was ordained to the Priesthood on June 25, 1983, and died Friday, March 3, 2017, at Maimonides Medical Center.

Monsignor Brown served the Diocese of Brooklyn as Pastor of Saint Thomas Aquinas (Flatlands), Saint Francis de Sales (Belle Harbor), as an Administrator of Queen of All Saints (Brooklyn), and as Parochial Vicar of Saint Clare (Rosedale) and Saint Joseph (Long Island City). He was appointed Vice-Chancellor, Director of Office for Clergy Personnel, Chairman of the Committee for Long Term Disability Program for Priests and as Dean of the Brooklyn 11 Deanery. On March 10, 1999, he was named Prelate of Honor to His Holiness.

The arrangements are as follows: Read more »