BROOKLYN PRIEST TO BE INSTALLED AS BISHOP OF PATERSON WEDNESDAY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 30, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

BROOKLYN PRIEST TO BE INSTALLED AS BISHOP OF PATERSON WEDNESDAY

The Diocese of Brooklyn has announced that Bishop-elect Kevin Sweeney, currently the Pastor of St. Michael’s Roman Catholic Church in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn, will be ordained and installed as the eighth Bishop of the Diocese of Paterson at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, 381 Grand Street in Paterson, New Jersey, on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, at 2 p.m.

The ordination/installation Mass will be televised live on NET-TV, the Diocese of Brooklyn’s cable channel, and online at www.netny.tv beginning at 1:40 p.m., with the procession to start at 1:45 p.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, July 1.

Cardinal Joseph Tobin, Metropolitan Archbishop of Newark will ordain Bishop-elect Sweeney to the Order of Bishops and install him as the new bishop of Paterson.  The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, will join retiring Bishop Arthur J. Serratelli as co-consecrating bishops.

Bishop-elect Sweeney is a native of Queens, New York, a graduate of Cathedral Prep High School, who went on to study at the Cathedral Seminary House of Formation in Douglaston. He then earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Philosophy from St. John’s University in 1992. Bishop-elect Kevin Sweeney also earned a Master’s Degree in Divinity from the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception in Huntington.

He was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn on June 28, 1997, and was assigned to St. Nicholas of Tolentine in Jamaica and Our Lady of Sorrows in Corona. In 2004, Bishop DiMarzio appointed then-Father Sweeney as the Vocations Director for the Diocese of Brooklyn, and in January 2010, he was appointed Pastor of St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Sunset Park.

NET-TV can be seen in the New York City area on Spectrum-channel 97, Optimum-channel 30, and FIOS by Verizon-channel 48. Video footage must include a courtesy to NET-TV/DeSales Media.

 

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BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO TO ORDAIN FOUR MEN AS PRIESTS TO SERVE THE DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 27, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

PHOTO UPDATE: Photos attached – Courtesy: Ed Wilkinson/The Tablet

BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO TO ORDAIN FOUR MEN AS PRIESTS TO SERVE THE DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN

            The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, will ordain four men as priests during a Mass of Ordination, later this morning, Saturday, June 27, 2020, at 11:00 a.m., at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph, located at 856 Pacific Street in the Prospect Heights section of Brooklyn.

 

The four to be ordained include:

 

*Rev. Mr. Nestor Martinez, born in Colombia and raised on a farm outside the City of Molagavita, felt the calling to become a priest at the age of thirteen. Later on, after achieving his goal and starting in the Seminary in Antioquia, he decided he wanted to go to a place that didn’t have enough vocations, and traveled to the United States. Mr. Martinez completed his seminarian studies in Connecticut and service in the Diocese of Paterson, and will be ordained in the Diocese of Brooklyn.

 

*Rev. Mr. Peter Okajima, raised in a family that did not practice religion, is a late vocation who had a career in finance, was married with two children, divorced, and had his marriage annulled. Throughout his life, Mr. Okajima always felt in his heart that something was missing, which led him to the Church. Peter converted to Catholicism and soon thereafter, enrolled at the Pope St. John XXIII Seminary at the advice of Bishop DiMarzio. Peter’s father was a Japanese translator for General Douglas McArthur’s team during the surrender aboard the USS Missouri at the end of World War II. Peter’s mother was held in a Japanese internment camp during World War II.

 

*Rev. Mr. Gabriel Agudelo-Perdomo, who was raised in Bogota, Colombia, felt the calling to the priesthood at the end of high school.  However, the unrest in his hometown delayed his calling, but the drug-related violence in Colombia made his vocation certain. Deacon Agudelo-Perdomo’s brother, a priest in the Archdiocese of Miami, shared his brother’s wish to become a priest on a trip to New York City, and it was Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio who sent a priest in Colombia to interview him. Gabriel Agudelo-Perdomo was then accepted as a Seminarian of the Diocese of Brooklyn.

 

*Rev. Mr. Dragan Pusic, who was born in Bosnia, grew up under Communist rule. Despite the government’s dislike of religion, the Pusic family attended Church every Sunday, and Dragan served as an altar server from the age of 9 until he was 14. Mr. Pusic maintained a professional career, working in an industrial plant for over twenty years, until the company went bankrupt.  It was at this time that Dragan recognized that faith was playing less of a role in his life, and found his way back to God.  It was shortly thereafter that he arrived in the United States and began his studies at the Redemptoris Mater Seminary in Douglaston.

 

Members of the media are encouraged to attend.

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Diocese of Brooklyn Launches Videos in Seven Languages to Prepare Catholics as Churches Can Re-open for Weekday Masses on Monday

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 26, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

Diocese of Brooklyn Launches Videos in Seven Languages to Prepare Catholics
as Churches Can Re-open for Weekday Masses on Monday

Weekday Masses in the Diocese of Brooklyn, which includes Queens, can begin this Monday, June 29, 2020. The celebration of Sunday Mass can begin with the Saturday Vigil Mass on July 4, 2020, and on Sunday, July 5, 2020. COVID-19 safety protocols will be in place, including the requirement that all who enter a church must bring and must wear their own mask during the entire Mass and maintain proper social distancing.

“Catholics in Brooklyn and Queens have been longing for the celebration of Mass and to receive the Holy Eucharist. But our sacrifice and patience have borne fruit, and we did our part to flatten the curve of the terrible coronavirus pandemic. Soon we can come together to be nourished by the spiritual food we have been desperate for,” said the Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn.

In preparation for the joyous day when Mass will resume, DeSales Media Group, the communication, and technology arm of the Diocese of Brooklyn, has produced videos in seven languages to give multi-lingual Catholics in Brooklyn and Queens an understanding of the changes they will experience as a result of COVID-19 safety protocols designed to keep everyone healthy and safe.

The videos were made in EnglishSpanishItalianPolishChineseCreole, and Korean.

Beyond the requirement that parishioners must bring and wear their own mask during Mass, churches can only be filled to 25% capacity to fulfill social distance requirements of six feet between congregants. Families who live in the same household will be able to sit together.

The reception of Communion will be different. It is strongly recommended the faithful receive Holy Communion in the hand and they must leave their mask on when they approach the priest at a six-foot distance. When the communicant receives the Sacred Host, they should move to the side and consume the Eucharist immediately. Communion will only be offered in one form; the Precious Blood will not be distributed to the faithful at this time.

Since each church and parish is unique, the faithful should check with their individual parishes, parish websites and social media pages for specifics about the resumption of Mass and the safety protocols in place.

The dispensation from the obligation to attend Mass remains in effect until further notice.  As such, the Diocese urges anyone who feels sick in any way to stay home. Mass will continue to be broadcast live on the Diocesan cable channel, NET-TV, and streamed online.  NET-TV is available in the New York City market on Spectrum, channel 97; Optimum, channel 30; and Fios by Verizon, channel 48.

“We have endured a period of great challenge, especially here in our Diocese in Brooklyn and Queens, but the Lord was with us all the way. Now in just over a week, we can come together and give thanks to Him, pray for the people we lost, and those still affected by the coronavirus. And rejoice in the celebration of the Liturgy. Thanks be to God,” concluded Bishop DiMarzio.

###

BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO TO ORDAIN FOUR MEN AS PRIESTS TO SERVE THE DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 25, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

BISHOP NICHOLAS DIMARZIO TO ORDAIN FOUR MEN AS PRIESTS TO SERVE THE DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN

The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, will ordain four men as priests during a Mass of Ordination, to be held on Saturday, June 27, 2020, at 11:00 a.m., at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph, located at 856 Pacific Street in the Prospect Heights section of Brooklyn.

Those who will be ordained include: one from Colombia who sought to serve in the United States where vocations are low; another who practiced religion despite Communist opposition in Bosnia; a man who was married with two children, who later got divorced and had his marriage annulled, because in his heart he felt something was missing; and one who saw the troubles of drug-related violence in Colombia growing up which in part inspired him to want to become a priest.

 

The four ordinands are:

*Rev. Mr. Nestor Martinez, born in Colombia and raised on a farm outside the City of Molagavita, felt the calling to become a priest at the age of thirteen. Later on, after achieving his goal and starting in the Seminary in Antioquia, he decided he wanted to go to a place that didn’t have enough vocations, and traveled to the United States. Mr. Martinez completed his seminarian studies in Connecticut and service in the Diocese of Paterson, and will be ordained in the Diocese of Brooklyn.

*Rev. Mr. Peter Okajima, raised in a family that did not practice religion, is a late vocation who had a career in finance, was married with two children, divorced, and had his marriage annulled. Throughout his life, Mr. Okajima always felt in his heart that something was missing, which led him to the Church. Peter converted to Catholicism and soon thereafter, enrolled at the Pope St. John XXIII Seminary at the advice of Bishop DiMarzio.

Peter’s father was a Japanese translator for General Douglas McArthur’s team during the surrender aboard the USS Missouri at the end of World War II. Peter’s mother was held in a Japanese internment camp during World War II.

*Rev. Mr. Gabriel Agudelo-Perdomo, who was raised in Bogota, Colombia, felt the calling to the priesthood at the end of high school.  However, the unrest in his hometown delayed his calling, but the drug-related violence in Colombia made his vocation certain. Deacon Agudelo-Perdomo’s brother, a priest in the Archdiocese of Miami, shared his brother’s wish to become a priest on a trip to New York City, and it was Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio who sent a priest in Colombia to interview him. Gabriel Agudelo-Perdomo was then accepted as a Seminarian of the Diocese of Brooklyn.

*Rev. Mr. Dragan Pusic, who was born in Bosnia, grew up under Communist rule. Despite the government’s dislike of religion, the Pusic family attended Church every Sunday, and Dragan served as an altar server from the age of 9 until he was 14. Mr. Pusic maintained a professional career, working in an industrial plant for over twenty years, until the company went bankrupt.  It was at this time that Dragan recognized that faith was playing less of a role in his life, and found his way back to God.  It was shortly thereafter that he arrived in the United States and began his studies at the Redemptoris Mater Seminary in Douglaston.

The Diocese of Brooklyn Ordination Mass will air live on the Diocesan’s cable channel, NET-TV, which can be seen on Spectrum, channel 97; Optimum, channel 30; and Fios by Verizon, channel 48.

Members of the media are encouraged to attend the Mass. To RSVP, please email John Quaglione at jquaglione@desalesmedia.org.

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Las iglesias de la Diócesis de Brooklyn pueden reabrir para celebrar misas entre semana el 29 de junio Las celebraciones de la misa dominical pueden comenzar el fin de semana del 4 y 5 de julio

 

PARA PUBLICACIÓN INMEDIATA: 19 de junio de 2020

 

CONTACTOS DE MEDIOS:

Adriana Rodriguez

718-517-3143

arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

 

John Quaglione

718-517-3112

jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

 

Las iglesias de la Diócesis de Brooklyn pueden reabrir para celebrar misas entre semana

el 29 de junio

Las celebraciones de la misa dominical pueden comenzar el fin de semana del 4 y 5 de julio

 

El Reverendísimo Mons. Nicholas DiMarzio, obispo de Brooklyn, se complace en anunciar que las iglesias de la Diócesis de Brooklyn pueden reabrir para celebrar misa, de lunes a viernes, el lunes 29 de junio de 2020. La celebración de la misa dominical puede iniciarse con la vigilia del sábado 4 de julio de 2020, y el domingo 5 de julio de 2020. Se implementarán los protocolos de seguridad por el COVID-19, incluido el requisito de que todos los que entren a la iglesia deben traer y usar su propia mascarilla facial durante toda la Misa y mantener un distanciamiento social apropiado.

“Los católicos de Brooklyn y Queens llevan tiempo deseando que se reanude la celebración de la misa y poder recibir la Sagrada Eucaristía. Pues nuestro sacrificio y paciencia han dado frutos, y contribuimos con nuestra parte a aplanar la curva de esta terrible pandemia del coronavirus. Pronto podremos congregarnos para nutrirnos con el alimento espiritual por el que hemos esperado con ansias”, dijo Mons. DiMarzio.

Como preparación para el gozoso día en que se reanudarán las misas, la Diócesis de Brooklyn lanzará hoy un video en inglés y en español para que los católicos de Brooklyn y Queens conozcan los cambios que se efectuarán, como resultado de los protocolos de seguridad por el COVID-19, para mantener a todos sanos y seguros.

Además del requisito de que los feligreses deben traer y usar su propia mascarilla facial durante la misa, las parroquias limitarán su aforo a un 25% de su capacidad para cumplir con los protocolos de distancia social de seis pies entre los fieles. Sin embargo, las familias que viven en el mismo hogar podrán sentarse juntas.

La manera de tomar la comunión será diferente. Se recomienda encarecidamente que los fieles reciban la Sagrada Comunión en la mano y que se dejen la mascarilla puesta cuando se acerquen al sacerdote, a una distancia de seis pies. Cuando el comulgante reciba la Hostia Consagrada, debe moverse hacia un lado y consumir la Eucaristía de inmediato. La comunión solo se dará de este modo; la Preciosa Sangre no se ofrecerá a los fieles en este momento.

Ya que cada iglesia y parroquia es única, los fieles deben consultar con sus parroquias individuales, sitios web y redes sociales de su parroquia para obtener información específica sobre la reanudación de las misas y los protocolos de seguridad puestos en práctica.

La dispensa del precepto dominical permanece vigente hasta nuevo aviso. Como tal, la Diócesis insta a quedarse en casa a aquel que sienta algún tipo de malestar o enfermedad. La misa continuará transmitiéndose en vivo por la televisión a través de NET-TV, y online. El canal diocesano por cable NET-TV está disponible en la ciudad de Nueva York en Spectrum, canal 97; Óptimo, canal 30; y Fios de Verizon, canal 48.

“Hemos sufrido un período de grandes desafíos, especialmente aquí en nuestra diócesis de Brooklyn y Queens, pero el Señor ha estado con nosotros todo este tiempo. Ahora, en poco más de una semana, podemos congregarnos y darle gracias, orar por los hermanos que perdimos y por los que aún están afectados por el coronavirus. ¡Regocíjate en la celebración de la Liturgia! Gracias a Dios”, concluyó Mons. DiMarzio.

###

 

Diocese of Brooklyn Churches Can Re-open for Weekday Masses on June 29 Celebrations of Sunday Mass Can Begin on the Weekend of July 4 & 5

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 19, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

Diocese of Brooklyn Churches Can Re-open for Weekday Masses on June 29
Celebrations of Sunday Mass Can Begin on the Weekend of July 4 & 5

 The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, is pleased to announce that churches in the Diocese of Brooklyn can re-open for Weekday Mass on Monday, June 29, 2020. The celebration of Sunday Mass can begin with the Saturday Vigil Mass on July 4, 2020, and on Sunday, July 5, 2020. COVID-19 safety protocols will be in place, including the requirement that all who enter a church must bring and must wear their own mask during the entire Mass and maintain proper social distancing.

“Catholics in Brooklyn and Queens have been longing for the celebration of Mass and to receive the Holy Eucharist. But our sacrifice and patience have borne fruit, and we did our part to flatten the curve of the terrible coronavirus pandemic. Soon we can come together to be nourished by the spiritual food we have been desperate for,” said Bishop DiMarzio.

In preparation for the joyous day when Mass will resume, the Diocese of Brooklyn is launching a video today in English and Spanish to give Catholics in Brooklyn and Queens an understanding of the changes they will experience as a result of COVID-19 safety protocols designed to keep everyone healthy and safe.

Beyond the requirement that parishioners must bring and must wear their own mask for Mass, churches can only be filled to 25% capacity to fulfill social distance requirements of six feet between congregants. Families who live in the same household though will be able to sit together.

The reception of Communion will be different. It is strongly recommended the faithful receive Holy Communion in the hand and they must leave their mask on when they approach the priest at a six-foot distance. When the communicant receives the Sacred Host, they should move to the side and consume the Eucharist immediately. Communion will only be offered in one form; the Precious Blood will not be distributed to the faithful at this time.

Since each church and parish is unique, the faithful should check with their individual parishes, parish websites and social media pages for specifics about the resumption of Mass and the safety protocols in place.

The dispensation from the obligation to attend Mass remains in effect until further notice.  As such, the Diocese urges anyone who feels sick in any way to stay home. Mass will continue to be broadcast live on the Diocesan cable channel, NET-TV, and streamed online.  NET-TV is available in the New York City market on Spectrum, channel 97; Optimum, channel 30; and Fios by Verizon, channel 48.

“We have endured a period of great challenge, especially here in our Diocese in Brooklyn and Queens, but the Lord was with us all the way. Now in just over a week, we can come together and give thanks to Him, pray for the people we lost, and those still affected by the coronavirus. And rejoice in the celebration of the Liturgy. Thanks be to God,” concluded Bishop DiMarzio.

###

Declaración de Mons. Nicholas DiMarzio, obispo de Brooklyn, sobre el fallo de la Corte Suprema a favor de D.A.C.A.

PARA SU PUBLICACIÓN INMEDIATA: 18 de junio de 2020

 

CONTACTOS EN LOS MEDIOS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

Declaración de Mons. Nicholas DiMarzio, obispo de Brooklyn, sobre el fallo de la

Corte Suprema a favor de D.A.C.A.

 

El Reverendísimo Mons. Nicholas DiMarzio, obispo de Brooklyn, emitió el siguiente comunicado en respuesta al fallo de la Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos que ha impedido la cancelación del programa D.A.C.A:

“Hoy, la Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos hizo lo correcto y moral al tomar la decisión de rechazar el intento de la administración Trump de poner fin al programa de Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia —conocido como D.A.C.A., por sus siglas en inglés— por razones humanitarias”. El tribunal supremo reconoció la intención de la ley y también la imposibilidad humana de afectar un cambio que conduciría a la deportación de muchos jóvenes traídos a los Estados Unidos cuando eran niños.

Los Dreamers (soñadores) llegaron a este país con sus padres, sin intención de violar la ley. Para la mayoría de ellos, Estados Unidos es el único país que conocen. Muchos soñadores han venido y han cumplido su propio sueño americano, obteniendo una educación y alcanzando metas con las que sus padres solo podían soñar. Las noticias de hoy destacan sus éxitos y sus contribuciones a nuestra nación. Una de las noticias señalaba que “los trabajadores en el sector de la salud y que se encuentran en la primera línea de la lucha contra el coronavirus dependen de unos 27,000 receptores de D.A.C.A., ‘incluidos dentistas, farmacéuticos, asistentes médicos, asistentes de salud en el hogar, técnicos’ y casi 200 estudiantes de medicina”.

Esta decisión es acertada y justa para estos jóvenes indocumentados, que han sido víctimas de un feroz debate político y han estado viviendo bajo el temor constante de la deportación. Deportar a los Dreamers a tierras desconocidas hace caso omiso de sus sacrificios, sus aportes y su enorme potencial. También significaría una gran pérdida para nuestro país.

La inmigración es uno de los temas más complejos y polémicos de nuestro tiempo. He dedicado estos últimos 50 años de mi sacerdocio a ayudar a inmigrantes y refugiados. Hoy, albergo las esperanzas para nuestra nación, de que esta decisión del tribunal supremo del país conducirá a una reforma migratoria integral de la que hemos estado hablando durante años”.

###

 

Durante mucho tiempo, el obispo Nicholas DiMarzio ha sido líder nacional e internacional en defensa de los migrantes y recién llegados. Es presidente de la junta del Centro de Estudios sobre Migración. Mons. DiMarzio fue miembro del Consejo Pontificio para la Atención Pastoral de los Migrantes e Itinerantes. Además, se desempeñó como director ejecutivo del Comité de Migración de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos (USCCB, por sus siglas en inglés), presidente de la Red Católica de Inmigración Legal (CLINIC, por sus siglas en inglés) y representante de los Estados Unidos ante la Comisión Mundial sobre las Migraciones Internacionales, una Comisión auspiciada por las Naciones Unidas.

 

Mons. DiMarzio también ha sido miembro de las juntas de la Comisión Católica Internacional de Migración (ICMC, por su sigla en inglés) y del Foro Nacional de Inmigración, Refugiados y Ciudadanía. Ha presidido la Junta de Consejeros y es miembro del Instituto de Políticas de Migración (MPI, por su sigla en inglés). Además ocupar varios cargos de liderazgo, el obispo DiMarzio ha publicado numerosos documentos y discursos, y en repetidas ocasiones ha declarado ante el Congreso sobre asuntos migratorios.

Statement by Brooklyn Bishop DiMarzio on Today’s Supreme Court Ruling on DACA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 18, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

Statement by Brooklyn Bishop DiMarzio on Today’s Supreme Court Ruling on DACA

The Most Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of Brooklyn, has issued the following statement in response to today’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling preventing the discontinuation of the D.A.C.A. program:

“Today the United States Supreme Court did the right and moral thing with its decision to halt the Trump administration’s attempt to end DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, based on humanitarian grounds. The high court recognized the intent of the law and also the human impossibility of affecting a change which would lead to the deportation of many young people brought to the U.S. as children.

The Dreamers came to this country with their parents, with no intent to break the law. For most of them, America is the only country they have ever known. Many dreamers have come and fulfilled their own American Dream, getting an education, and making a life their parents could only dream of. Today’s news reports highlight their success and their contributions to our country. In one it said ‘frontline health care workers involved in responding to the coronavirus epidemic rely on about 27,000 DACA recipients, “including dentists, pharmacists, physician assistants, home health aides, technicians” and nearly 200 medical students.’

This decision is right and just for these undocumented youth, who have been victims in a fierce political debate and have been living under the constant fear of deportation. Deporting the Dreamers to unfamiliar lands would disregard their sacrifices, contributions, and immense potential. It would also be a great loss for our country.

Immigration is one of the most complex and controversial issues of our time. These past 50 years of my priesthood have been dedicated to assisting immigrants and refugees. Today, I am hopeful for our country, that this decision by the highest court in the land will lead to the comprehensive immigration reform we have been talking about for years.”

###

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio has long been a national and international leader in the defense of migrants and newcomers. He is Chairman of the Board of the Center for Migration Studies. Bishop DiMarzio was a Member of the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People. In addition, he has served as Chairman of the Migration Committee of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), Chairman of the Board of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC), and the representative from the United States to the Global Commission on International Migration, a United Nations-sponsored Commission.

Bishop DiMarzio also served on the Boards of the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the National Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Forum. He has chaired the Board of Trustees and is a member of the Migration Policy Institute (MPI). In addition to the many leadership positions he has held, Bishop DiMarzio has published numerous papers and speeches and testified before Congress on migration issues on many occasions.

“Faith and America’s Original Sin:” A Currents News Special Broadcast on Racism in the Diocese of Brooklyn Takes an Introspective Look by Listening to African American Catholics

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 17, 2020

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Adriana Rodriguez
718-517-3143
arodriguez@desalesmedia.org

John Quaglione 
718-517-3112
jquaglione@desalesmedia.org

“Faith and America’s Original Sin:” A Currents News Special Broadcast on Racism in the Diocese of Brooklyn Takes an Introspective Look by Listening to African American Catholics

Currents News, the nightly program that covers news from the Catholic perspective on NET-TV, is airing a special broadcast that addresses the issue of racism and the progress being made in the Diocese of Brooklyn.

“Faith and America’s Original Sin,” hosted by Currents News Anchor Christine Persichette, will air tonight at 7:30 pm on NET-TV, the cable channel of the Diocese of Brooklyn. The special program addresses the work of the Diocesan Commission on Racism and Social Justice, which was instituted by Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio in 2017, after the white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia.  The special features testimonials from listening session members and Commission members.

The Commission has been hosting listening sessions with African-American Catholics in the Diocese to hear their perspective. “I think it was very important that we listen to the people of our diocese to understand their experience of racism both in society and within the church,” said Auxiliary Bishop Neil Tiedemann, Chair of the Commission.

Father Alonzo Cox, Secretary of the Commission, said hearing stories of racism experienced by Catholics is necessary, painful as it is. “We went on to ask our participants how they have experienced racism. Many of them gave horror stories unfortunately of how people in the pews treated them, how they were treated by priests or religious and a lot of it is perception. They perceived that they felt treated differently because of the color of their skin,” said Father Cox.

“We are moving forward so that each and every one of us can come together to preach the word of God,”  said Father Cox. He also speaks of two late priests on the path to Sainthood, Monsignor Bernard J. Quinn, and Father Augustus Tolton.

Monsignor Quinn opened a church for African American Catholics, St. Peter Claver in Bedford-Stuyvesant, at a time when the color of one’s skin was a barrier to attending Mass. Father Augustus Tolton, who was born a slave, was the first African-American priest ordained in the United States. Father Tolton had to attend a seminary in Rome for no American seminaries at the time would accept him.

“It is incumbent upon all of us to broaden ourselves to get to know persons beyond our so-called circle of comfort,” said Judge Bert Anthony Bunyan, a Commission Member.

Currents News airs on NET-TV in the New York City market seven days a week. It’s available on Spectrum, channel 97; Optimum, channel 30; Fios by Verizon, channel 48.

“Faith and America’s Original Sin,” can also be seen on the Currents News YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/MEoqs_LdTJE.

 

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